Revisiting Traditional Gender Identities in Disaster Response

From the late 1990s several scholars have highlighted how women are more vulnerable to the impacts of different disasters due to their reproductive and care-giving roles. This monolithic representation of women as ‘victims’ has later been challenged by different scholars (cf.Hydman and deAlwis, 2003; Ruwanpura, 2008; Gandhi, 2010; Enarson, 2012). Feminists from the Majority World […]

Continue Reading

Work, Women and Rituals: The Bitter ‘karwa chauth’

Work, Women and Rituals: The Bitter ‘karwa chauth’ So what if women work? She may head her department, be the most reliable corporate manager, or constitute the pillar of a bureaucratic mission – she remains a woman and there it all ends. Even for herself! The blur between the within and the without is lessening […]

Continue Reading

Disaster Preparedness, Gender and Vulnerable Coastal Communities

India is one of the most vulnerable countries that are recurrently prone to natural disasters, cyclone being one of the most prominent. Perhaps more stark than the calamities is the marginalisation of women during and post disasters; being increasingly exposed to crime, unsafe delivery and poor nutrition. Moreover, breakage of community linkages and the matrix […]

Continue Reading
environmental concerns

Environmental Concerns Why Women, Let Everybody Claim and Own the Stakes

Scholars have argued that women have an affinity with nature because both are subjected to domination; women by men and nature by culture. In such a conceptual framework, nature is equated with femininity and culture with masculinity. The proponents of this ideology contend that cultural artefacts have destroyed nature through modern technologies which are patriarchal […]

Continue Reading