Glacial Landforms

Glacial Landforms in Relation to the Himalayas

Glaciers are represented by the flowing movement of a thick mass of ice and form as a result of the compaction or recrystallization of snow. Glaciers occur in areas whose climate favours the seasonal accumulation of snow in greater volumes than seasonal ablation. Here the seasonal accumulation of snow outpaces seasonal ablation that occurs due […]

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Himalaya | Seeking a Coordinated Approach in Glacier Research

The 2400 km long arcuate Himalaya-Hindu Kush mountain range supports largest accumulation of snow and ice following the Polar regions of Arctic and Antarctic and Greenland. Apart from the several peaks that attain more than 8000 m heights above mean sea level, the Himalaya also brings to life many major rivers that support ~1.3 billion […]

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On Thin Ice: Arctic, Antarctic and the Himalayas

The melting of snow in the Arctic and Antarctic due to global warming and climate change is reported frequently. However, the melting of the Himalayan glaciers goes largely unreported, even though more people are impacted. Anomalies in temperatures, global cryosphere and sea level rise are the driving factors for negative impact on global conveyor belt […]

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Climate change

The Himalayan ecosystem has 51 million people who practice hill agriculture and whose vulnerability is expected to increase with changing climatic regime. The National Action Plan on Climate Change envisages a National Mission for sustaining the Himalayan ecosystem to evolve management measures for sustaining and safeguarding the Himalayan glacier and mountain ecosystem. An observational and […]

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